Transitional Government in Syria Not a Good Idea


Last week Russia slammed Hillary Clinton in her remarks concerning Syria. Fine, everyone is entitled to their own opinions. Russia also stated that Clinton’s comments (which I will not be focusing on) directly contradicted what the U.S. and Russia agreed upon over how to handle the crisis in Syria back in June. Ok, so maybe Washington adjusted their stance on Syria since then. According to Russia, “Washington and Moscow had both agreed in Geneva to support setting up a transition government that would be decided by the Syrian people as a first step for ending the 20-month crisis.”

Hilary Clinton shakes hands with the Albanian President on November 1, 2012.

Wait, what? …

Sure, elections have become the prescribed remedy for any country fraught with instability, which mind you doesn’t always work. However, that is not the bit of the article that gave me one of those “pause” moments that one sometimes experiences when they hear, see, or read something that short circuits their logic. Is Russia really suggesting that Syria should vote upon whom they wholeheartedly believe would be a responsible and trusting person in government? Russia? The same country which saw its own political crisis just last year during their election? The same country where allegations of voting scandal were running rampant one year ago? Alright, I’m always open to hear Russia’s ideas when it comes to politics.

Russia and the U.S. thought that Syrians would be able to create their own “transition government” back in Geneva this summer. This government could possibly be the precursor to ending the violence that has been all too prevalent in Syria according to The Daily Star, a Lebanese new outlet. I don’t mean to rain on Washington and Moscow’s parade but if Syrians cannot respect a cease fire that was implemented for Eid celebrations just this past week then how can they expect to decide on whom to put in their country’s place of ultimate power. Even if this would be a “transition government” what if the “transition President” (or ruler) finds their newly given power to be exactly what they’ve been missing their whole life? In other terms, what if they abuse that power? Would there be another crisis? Furthermore, what would all of a sudden stop the currently violent Alawites and Sunnis from going at each other as they have been for almost two years now? Would these two groups respect the decision Syrians come to about whom should be in power?

Current President of Syria Bashar al- Assad.

There are too many unanswerable questions. I do not see how the U.S or Russia could have seen a “transitional government” for Syria, at this point in time, as plausible even. There are too many variables that one could not even begin to predict for a transition government to work as was proposed in Geneva.

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6 thoughts on “Transitional Government in Syria Not a Good Idea

  1. This is a very shocking blog, the fact that anyone thinks that right now would be the proper time for Syria to start forming a new government and picking a new leader is astounding. All the continuous fighting and government issues in Syria their number one issue should not be choosing the next leader when the current leader is still causing conflict. Of course the U.S wants to do what they can to help in Syria but do they honestly think this is the best solution right now? There are a lot of unanswered questions with this plan and in Syria in general. I’m not saying that a new government leader is not what Syria needs but picking one right now might not be the best idea.

  2. This is a very shocking blog, the fact that anyone thinks that right now would be the proper time for Syria to start forming a new government and picking a new leader is astounding. All the continuous fighting and government issues in Syria their number one issue should not be choosing the next leader when the current leader is still causing conflict. Of course the U.S wants to do what they can to help in Syria but do they honestly think this is the best solution right now? There are a lot of unanswered questions with this plan and in Syria in general. I’m not saying that a new government leader is not what Syria needs but picking one right now might not be the best idea.

  3. I agree with Shelby. This blog is very shocking and I think that with all the conflict Syria has that forming a new government and choosing a new leader is not the right thing to do. As happy as I am that the United States wants to help Syria, I really feel that waiting until a more stable time is the best thing to do. I think this calls for a more appropriate time.

  4. I agree that it is too soon for Syria to attempt to set up and support a new government and leaders but at what point do we stop waiting? A country in chaos will stay in chaos unless definitive actions are taken. Ultimately I think a new government right now would fail but what is the breaking point in Syria, when the people and the current leaders grow tired and frustrated with the fighting? Or will that ever happen? I realize these are several unanswerable questions I just wish I knew what the future holds for the country because right now it is hard to be optimistic.

  5. The state that Syria is in now would not be able to agree on a government to rule them now. Neither side would agree or support a government that is not what they want. Simply putting a new leader in place could make them rebel even more. It is hard to tell if Syria will be ready to accept a new leader soon or if the violence will continue to spiral out of control. I believe there will never be a right time to put in place a new leader but some change needs to be made. It is clear that the two groups in Syria will not stop fighting anytime soon when they cannot even cease fire for a holiday.

  6. The politics of international trusteeships has been highly debated in the past decade. The level of involvement of international communities such as the UN in cases such as Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq has caused the benefits of transitional governments to be questioned. In the case of Kosovo a number of issues have hindered social reconstruction because of the lack of clarity concerning the future status of the nation.
    While applying a temporary government may be a short-term solution to controlling the uninhibited chaos that have engulfed Syria, it is far from a long-term sustainable development of a nation.

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